About

About me

Hey, my name is Kay, born 1989 in Erlangen, Bavaria.

I am currently working as a Psychologist, creating photos both as a part of my job and as compensation.

Ever since i was 16, i tried to get my hands on everything related to photography. I started digital, but switched almost completely to analog photography. I work with all sizes, ages and types of cameras i can get a hold of. I develop and print by hand as well. My passion besides classical photos is to create something off the beaten tracks.

Besides taking pictures, I am currently writing as an author at analog4You about analog photography and my photographic experiments.

I hope you like the little snaps and pieces I created.

 

 

Features

Waste of Film Blog Feature

Film Shooters Collective March 2017 Polaroid Roundup

The Phoblographer Colorgrams: Combining Psychology and Analog Photography Accidents

The Impossible Project Magazine Instant Film Upcycling Experiments

 

 

Published Articles

English:

Getting to grips with darkroom printing using Caffenol (and alternatives) or just: Darkroom Alchemy at Emulsive

 

Deutsch:

Das Film Swap Projekt  auf Analog4You

Das Kaffe Projekt auf Analog4You

Lumen Printing auf Analog4You

Die Dunkelkammer als Saftladen auf Kwerfeldein

Der Charme der Unvollkommenheit auf APHOG

Die Dunkelkammer als Saftladen auf Kwerfeldein

Der Ein Vorstoss in der Dunkelkammer auf Emulsive

Print

SCHWARZWEISS Magazin 117: Analoge Szene - Zwei Fotografen, ein Film

PhotoKlassik III.2017Wasted Films


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  • „Photos which stand out from the crowd.“
  • "Wasted Films does not sound like something worth to pay attention to, only seemingly!"  
  • "Kay is among the most open-minded film artists I am aware of. He's not just a photographer...more of an alchemist. Or maybe a damn good b-movie crazy scientist."
  • "Kay's images take the idea of chance and coincidence, already especially prominent in film photography, to a whole new level. While they seem strangely odd at the beginning, they reach much deep under the surface and expose the viewer to subliminal notice rather than obvious statements. There is no distinct content in them, they moreover seem like a painting and not like photographs anymore."